Here are some studies that show the benefits of Hypopresiv e Exercises:

A study of 100 women (Esparza, 2007), average age of 36, with hypotonic pelvic floor muscles and stress urinary incontinence showed an increase in pelvic floor muscle tone (I.I.I.) by 58% and loading tone (shock absorption capacity) by 48% after a 6 month program of 20 minutes of daily hypopresive exercises. In addition, this study showed a 20% increase in contractile muscle strength and a 6% decrease in waist circumference (p= 000,3).

In 2007, Fernandez found similar results with a group of older adults (mean age 68,5 years). After training with hypopresive exercises 4 times per week for 6 months, they showed an increase in base tone by 23,5%, loading tone by 25,3%, and perineal blocking during exertion by 108,4%. Hypopresive techniques have been shown to be a useful tool in solving issues with incontinence in older adults of both sexes; in 85,7% of cases symptoms of urinary incontinence (stress or mixed) were decreased or disappeared completely as measured by the ICIQ-SF questionnaire.

Further studies by Caufriez (2007), showed positive results after a 10-week hypopresive program done just 1 hour per week. The subjects’ postures improved demonstrated by a repositioning of the plumb line, a decrease in lumbar lordosis (p=99,9%), a decrease in cervical lordosis (p=99,8%), a decrease in dorsal kyphosis (99,5%), and a decrease in scoliosis (p=96%). The subjects also reported a highly significant improvement (p=95%) in their sense of postural comfort (better mobility, better flexibility, less pain, and feeling lighter).

Recently a longitudinal study was completed by the University of Santiago and the University of Vigo. The study included 126 women between the ages of 25 and 60 (mean age 42,8 years) divided into two groups. Both groups did abdominal exercises for 30 minutes, 2 times per week for the 14 week duration of the study. The group that did hypopresive exercises showed a significant decrease of waist circumference by 3,5cm on average and a decrease of 2,8 points on the Spanish version (Espuña et al, 2004) of the urinary incontinence questionnaire IU ICIQ-SF. This equated to incontinence being completely resolved in some of the subjects (Rial and Pinsach, 2010).

Studies in progress seem to suggest an enhancement in cellular resistance to acidosis and an increase of the hematocrit during exertion. As of now it can only be hypothesized that these changes could be due to a splenic contraction reflex or an augment in erythropoietin.

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